Mural on an arc

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Mural on an arc

PanoTools NG mailing list
I've been asked to photograph a 50'x11' mural in a rotunda, so it's curved, thankfully on the inside of the curve. (Concave?) My plan is to set up in absolute center of the building and, using a Nodal Ninja panorama tripod head, photograph this in pieces, as if I were shooting a panorama. Then use Hugin to stitch them together. I'll have two lights with softboxes that will move from shot to shot. Their end goal is to have a reproducible, orthographic image of the mural.
 

 
 Has anyone shot something similar? Are there unforeseen challenges I'm not thinking of? I'll likely have only one crack at this (it's due to be removed) so I'd like to get it right the first time.
 

 Thanks!
 Jonathan
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Re: Mural on an arc

PanoTools NG mailing list
The dog that will likely bite you is lighting.. What is the distance you'll be from the wall? you'll need to get your arms around the actual distance of the FOV at that distance.. Your lights will be outside of that of course so they don't show.. So just like shooting large pieces of art for reproduction the problem is lighting the middle the same as the edges.... If your over 2/10 of a stop different from the edge to the center it's pretty visual.. So you'll have to go in smaller bites till you get there.. or add more lights.. Their is a software I use here called equi-light ..You shoot white sub strate first. Both the actual shot and the substrate shot then go into Equi-light and lighting errors are corrected with the software.. The other lighting issue of course will matching the lighting with each segment as you move the lights up and down and around the building.. How many rows and shots around are you planning and what size is the final output. If your figuring on lighting an 11' height with one light on each side ..They'll surly be very very powerful lights.. and remember you'll have fall off at the top and bottom also.. A lot of it depends on how big of a bite your taking with each exposure. All your time will be spent with lighting .. the rest is easy.. You may want to consider building a custom jig to hold the lights so you can repeat the set up easily as you move around the building..  What lights are you using ..I assume strobes  How many WS??   Good luck..

jimbo

----- Original Message -----
  From: [hidden email] [PanoToolsNG]
  To: [hidden email]
  Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 10:46 AM
  Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Mural on an arc


   

  I've been asked to photograph a 50'x11' mural in a rotunda, so it's curved, thankfully on the inside of the curve. (Concave?) My plan is to set up in absolute center of the building and, using a Nodal Ninja panorama tripod head, photograph this in pieces, as if I were shooting a panorama. Then use Hugin to stitch them together. I'll have two lights with softboxes that will move from shot to shot. Their end goal is to have a reproducible, orthographic image of the mural.





  Has anyone shot something similar? Are there unforeseen challenges I'm not thinking of? I'll likely have only one crack at this (it's due to be removed) so I'd like to get it right the first time.




  Thanks!

  Jonathan


 
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Re: Mural on an arc

PanoTools NG mailing list
In reply to this post by PanoTools NG mailing list
Am 29.10.2014 17:46, schrieb [hidden email]:

> I'll have two lights with softboxes that will move from shot to shot.

Jimbo is right, the lighting will be the problem. Is this in complete
darkness? If not, I'd consider shooting with available light, at least
if the lighting is even enough then. If you need to use artificial light
and if your softboxes don't provide even lighting across a frame, shoot
bracketed and use enfuse on the images prior to stitching. This likely
will produce evenly lit images. Use a large overlap (up to 50%), since
the blender (enblend or multiblend) will even out the lighting.

--
Erik Krause
http://www.erik-krause.de
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Re: Mural on an arc

PanoTools NG mailing list
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This is great information, thank you! I'll be shooting with two Einsteins - 640ws. I have other sub-par lights that can be used as well, but only with umbrellas. I'll be able to get back a ways from the painting, but I'm guessing 5 or 6 shots to fulfill the requirements. I may do several passes since I like options.
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Re: Mural on an arc

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The available light is tricky, since it's from windows above the painting - if I choose the right time of day, I could get the light coming in from behind, but I'm planning on waiting until after dark. Thanks for the overlap tip - I tend to shoot for 30-40% but I'll up it for this.
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Re: Mural on an arc

PanoTools NG mailing list
If you're equidistant from the panel, putting just one light source just
behind you will ensure that the light will also be equidistant, right? Now,
you have two choices (from my P.O.V., sorry for the pun): One, use a big
sphere as a light modifier, very high above the tripod, to avoid it to be
reflected on the panel; two, use a very small light source, even the bare
flash bulb, and then you won't need to rise it so much. The reflection, if
there will be one, will be very small, barely noticeable. And the distance
will be large enough to diminish the light fall from the top to the bottom,
and easily fixable in post.
Hope this helps,


Rodolpho Pajuaba
www.pajuaba.com.br/heterose
www.pajuaba.com.br/panoblog
www.pajuaba.com.br/traduzindophotoshop
Follow me on Twitter - @rpajuaba

2014-10-29 17:02 GMT-02:00 [hidden email] [PanoToolsNG] <
[hidden email]>:

>
>
> The available light is tricky, since it's from windows above the painting
> - if I choose the right time of day, I could get the light coming in from
> behind, but I'm planning on waiting until after dark. Thanks for the
> overlap tip - I tend to shoot for 30-40% but I'll up it for this.
>
>
>
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Re: Mural on an arc

PanoTools NG mailing list
In reply to this post by PanoTools NG mailing list
Hi again,
If your ok with it I'd be happy to try to help / coach you.. I have been involved in complex lighting for photography for I guess about 40 years now and have extensive interior & product experience.. and I have shot large murals that were on walls but not a curved one like your going to do.. on a daily basis I shoot art for reproduction.. In my studio I have about 28,000WS (not a typo) of Elinchrome lighting to work with plus God knows how much small other brand stuff. Anyway that being said..I need to go back to my questions.. and I'm gonna get a bit blunt in a couple of areas so don't freak out on me.. ok? Please.. OK, first this is not a small job.. I say that because they want to reproduce it.. so it's not a record shot.. Their are some things you really need to know. No kidding..
So here we goes..

What size do they want to repro it at? You do need that tied down as that will drive the whole process..
What is your shooting distance from the center of the room? No guessing allowed this is all mathematics.. not Kentucky windage.. :-)..
Does this image wrap around the total room or just part of it? The reason for that question is light in the room and my guess is it will be different in different places in the room. Any windows? you may need to gel them or shoot at a specific time of day or on a really over cast day.. they need to partner up if the later is the case..

Ok now the 650WS .... using a decent F stop and an art functional repro kinda asa says 5 rows.. If you rent some lighting equipment (1500WS / 2000WS) you should be able to get it to 3 rows.. I honestly wouldn't take it on with (2) 650's... just sayin.. be aware you may have to polarize..... that's 2 stops ..you really need to know that before you shoot it..

You need to know every inch of the room including it's present lighting.. If you walk in the day of the shoot and try to figure this all out you'll likely fail depending upon where their expectations are.

Thoughts.... I doubt this room only houses only the mural on the wall.. so what's in the way.. Are you expected to deal with that the day of the shoot.. is that your responsibility or theirs.. You are a shooter let them be the moving company.. and they need to have it cleared and ready for you..

What I'm trying very tactfully say.. I asked a couple of specific questions in my response to your post.. You didn't come back with answers.. I noticed that.. this isn't a wing-it job if they want to repro it.. to some degree.. I'll honestly help as will others here ....this is truly awesome group.. no kidding.. so if you want to take on .. I'll contribute and not play boss but I don't have a good feeling so far.. and I do totally understand impulse, courage and all that stuff..

To close .. I did a job for a Bank out here.. they support the arts huge.. actually they are great community supporters too. This is a really old building that they have totally restored rather then build a new one.. I admire them for that.. On one wall, behind the tellers, is a Mural not as big as what your taking on and a flat wall to boot.. so easier.. It was about 60 years old ...The building is about 100 years old in Livingston Montana.. The piece is 6 1/2 x 22 and done by a very special artist..  I had two days to do it.. ( Sat & Sunday ..their closed)  I was able to get in ahead of that to figure it out..  I made up a jury rig set of rails ..(wood) to be used with my Asba camera stand.. which was a total PIA to haul up there..(maybe 400 lbs)  This was shot with a Sinar 4x5 and film and then drum scanned (we still do that ole stuff here to).. (as a note for non film folks .. today I would have used the 8k Betterlight.. I just didn't own back then)   What it was all about was that this art was going to get restored.. so my work was a documentation of where we started at.. My bonus was that after the piece was restored I got to shoot it again.. The second time a no brainer.. an out of that effort .. I made prints for them and still do that they give to special customers..  

The point is simply do it right.. don't be bashful or impulsive .. right will win pretty much every time..

jimbo




 


  ----- Original Message -----
  From: [hidden email] [PanoToolsNG]
  To: [hidden email]
  Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 1:00 PM
  Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Mural on an arc


   
  This is great information, thank you! I'll be shooting with two Einsteins - 640ws. I have other sub-par lights that can be used as well, but only with umbrellas. I'll be able to get back a ways from the painting, but I'm guessing 5 or 6 shots to fulfill the requirements. I may do several passes since I like options.

 
  No virus found in this message.
  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
  Version: 2015.0.5557 / Virus Database: 4189/8475 - Release Date: 10/29/14