totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

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totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

giant_klobasa_monster
It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(

I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg

A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way
through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
http://dlavak.cz/index.htm

This is not your american road trip ;-)))

My mind is blown!
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Bostjan Burger
This guy ( http://www.zvoneseruga.com/galerije ) has done this same but with the motorbike, and this guy http://www.tomokriznar.com/tomokriznar.html has done it only with the bike. In 80-ies the routes Ljubjana, Zagreb or Belgrade via Spain, or via Turkey to SA were very popular. I have some French friends who traveled the Africa route same (easy) way as we traveled as 14 years old teenagers around Europe with the inter rail... true 80-ies were golden era for travel, much more safe I suppose. Going somewhere with the plane is just too easy ;)

Bostjan


________________________________
 From: Jeffrey Martin <[hidden email]>
To: panotoolsng <[hidden email]>
Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 11:52 AM
Subject: [PanoToolsNG] totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa
 

 
It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(

I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg

A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
http://dlavak.cz/index.htm 

This is not your american road trip ;-)))

My mind is blown!

 
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Ormar
To me it reminded a book, I readied 50 years ago, how Ji&#345;í Hanzelka and Miroslav Zikmund did same, testing the car - air cooled Tatra.
Sure, Africa was different then.


>
>  
> It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(
>
> I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
> https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg
>
> A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
> lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
> http://dlavak.cz/index.htm 
>
> This is not your american road trip ;-)))
>
> My mind is blown!
>


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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Trausti Hraunfjord
Haha... in Skoda no less.  My father had one of those in the early 70's....
and it died on him a few years later.  I would have made a different choice
for a car to use on a trip like that... NOT a new car (those are not as
reliable as old-school cars), but I would never have chosen an American car
or a Skoda.  Trabant maybe... they are too simple to fail beyond repair.

On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 8:40 AM, Ormar <[hidden email]> wrote:

> **
>
>
> To me it reminded a book, I readied 50 years ago, how Ji&#345;í Hanzelka
> and Miroslav Zikmund did same, testing the car - air cooled Tatra.
> Sure, Africa was different then.
>
> >
> > Â
> > It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(
> >
> > I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
> > https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg
> >
> > A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way
> through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
> > lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
> > http://dlavak.cz/index.htm
> >
> > This is not your american road trip ;-)))
> >
> > My mind is blown!
> >
>
>  
>
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Isaac Garcia-3
I know a guy who pedalled from the mouth of the Yellow River to Lisbon and
back to Madrid. Via Tibet, no less. It was a few years back when it was not
as hard to go there.

And as for planes being too easy, it's more about whether it's the journey
or the destination you want to enjoy... or have the time for ;)

On Aug 6, 2012 4:42 PM, "Trausti Hraunfjord" <[hidden email]>
wrote:
>
>
>
> Haha... in Skoda no less.  My father had one of those in the early
70's.... and it died on him a few years later.  I would have made a
different choice for a car to use on a trip like that... NOT a new car
(those are not as reliable as old-school cars), but I would never have
chosen an American car or a Skoda.  Trabant maybe... they are too simple to
fail beyond repair.
>
> On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 8:40 AM, Ormar <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> To me it reminded a book, I readied 50 years ago, how Ji&#345;í Hanzelka
and Miroslav Zikmund did same, testing the car - air cooled Tatra.

>> Sure, Africa was different then.
>>
>> >
>> > Â
>>
>> > It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(
>> >
>> > I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
>> > https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg
>> >
>> > A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way
through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.

>> > lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
>> > http://dlavak.cz/index.htm
>> >
>> > This is not your american road trip ;-)))
>> >
>> > My mind is blown!
>> >
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Your email settings: Individual Email|Traditional
> Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
> Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Daily Digest | Switch to
Fully Featured
> Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

giant_klobasa_monster
In reply to this post by Trausti Hraunfjord

Except that Trabants really are horrible things. People here say that it's the only thing that's made of cardboard that actually rusts ;)

It made me wonder... whether there will ever be a New car made that is truly mechanical like the old days. I guess there would be no demand for it.


--- In [hidden email], Trausti Hraunfjord <trausti.hraunfjord@...> wrote:

>
> Haha... in Skoda no less.  My father had one of those in the early 70's....
> and it died on him a few years later.  I would have made a different choice
> for a car to use on a trip like that... NOT a new car (those are not as
> reliable as old-school cars), but I would never have chosen an American car
> or a Skoda.  Trabant maybe... they are too simple to fail beyond repair.
>
> On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 8:40 AM, Ormar <rmrtmm@...> wrote:
>
> > **
> >
> >
> > To me it reminded a book, I readied 50 years ago, how Ji&#345;í Hanzelka
> > and Miroslav Zikmund did same, testing the car - air cooled Tatra.
> > Sure, Africa was different then.
> >
> > >
> > > Â
> > > It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(
> > >
> > > I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
> > > https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg
> > >
> > > A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way
> > through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
> > > lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
> > > http://dlavak.cz/index.htm
> > >
> > > This is not your american road trip ;-)))
> > >
> > > My mind is blown!
> > >
> >
> >  
> >
>


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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

John Riley-2


On Aug 6, 2012, at 3:30 PM, giant_klobasa_monster wrote:

> Except that Trabants really are horrible things. People here say that it's the only thing that's made of cardboard that actually rusts ;)
>
> It made me wonder... whether there will ever be a New car made that is truly mechanical like the old days. I guess there would be no demand for it.

My everyday driver is a 1966 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu. It is in very nice condition, gets comments, honks, waves, and flirtation constantly. Plus, it is as you say, truly mechanical and I can do a lot of the work on it myself. I bought it out of nostalgia for my first car that was the exact same model. Between the two, I have done most everything you can do without taking the heads off the block. It's a blast, but the lack of AC on that 107°F day last month was challenging. Young people look under the hood and wonder why it seems "empty", LOL.

I love the old, simple cars 8-)

John Riley
4Pi-VR Media Solutions
http://4pi-vr.com
[hidden email]
(h)864-461-3504
(c)864-431-7075
(w)864-503-5775
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Trausti Hraunfjord
In reply to this post by giant_klobasa_monster
I have some totally off topic experiences with Trabbi's... I agree they are
horrible, but also incredible.

Trausti

On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 2:30 PM, giant_klobasa_monster
<[hidden email]>wrote:

> **
>
>
>
> Except that Trabants really are horrible things. People here say that it's
> the only thing that's made of cardboard that actually rusts ;)
>
> It made me wonder... whether there will ever be a New car made that is
> truly mechanical like the old days. I guess there would be no demand for it.
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], Trausti Hraunfjord
> <trausti.hraunfjord@...> wrote:
> >
> > Haha... in Skoda no less. My father had one of those in the early
> 70's....
> > and it died on him a few years later. I would have made a different
> choice
> > for a car to use on a trip like that... NOT a new car (those are not as
> > reliable as old-school cars), but I would never have chosen an American
> car
> > or a Skoda. Trabant maybe... they are too simple to fail beyond repair.
> >
> > On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 8:40 AM, Ormar <rmrtmm@...> wrote:
> >
> > > **
>
> > >
> > >
> > > To me it reminded a book, I readied 50 years ago, how Ji&#345;í
> Hanzelka
> > > and Miroslav Zikmund did same, testing the car - air cooled Tatra.
> > > Sure, Africa was different then.
> > >
> > > >
> > > > Â
> > > > It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(
> > > >
> > > > I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
> > > > https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg
> > > >
> > > > A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way
> > > through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
> > > > lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
> > > > http://dlavak.cz/index.htm
> > > >
> > > > This is not your american road trip ;-)))
> > > >
> > > > My mind is blown!
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
>
>  
>
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Trausti Hraunfjord
In reply to this post by John Riley-2
Best car I ever had, was a Toyota Landcruiser Pickup 1975... 6 cyl diesel
engine and with a mechanical winch.  Tough as tough can get.  I have never
been lenient on any of my SUV's, and that Toyota took some really serious
beating and abusing, but never ever failed in any way or form.

Old and mechanical... that's the only reliable way to go.

Trausti

On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 2:59 PM, John Riley <[hidden email]> wrote:

> **
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 6, 2012, at 3:30 PM, giant_klobasa_monster wrote:
>
> Except that Trabants really are horrible things. People here say that it's
> the only thing that's made of cardboard that actually rusts ;)
>
> It made me wonder... whether there will ever be a New car made that is
> truly mechanical like the old days. I guess there would be no demand for it.
>
>
> My everyday driver is a 1966 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu. It is in very nice
> condition, gets comments, honks, waves, and flirtation constantly. Plus, it
> is as you say, truly mechanical and I can do a lot of the work on it
> myself. I bought it out of nostalgia for my first car that was the exact
> same model. Between the two, I have done most everything you can do without
> taking the heads off the block. It's a blast, but the lack of AC on that
> 107°F day last month was challenging. Young people look under the hood and
> wonder why it seems "empty", LOL.
>
> I love the old, simple cars 8-)
>
> John Riley
> 4Pi-VR Media Solutions
> http://4pi-vr.com
> [hidden email]
> (h)864-461-3504
> (c)864-431-7075
> (w)864-503-5775
>
>  
>
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Bostjan Burger
In reply to this post by Isaac Garcia-3
He, he... I know a man who swam Yellow River, Amazon River, Mississippi River, Parana River,...etc...: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Strel . I need to get him once to my panoramas ;)
Slovenian company Pipistrel has got the NASA reward (few days the Oshkosh Airventure)for their plane and few months ago their ultralight plane encircled the World and the new project is ongoing: http://wingsforscience.com , the pilot was our photographers colleague. 

:) Bostjan


________________________________
 From: Isaac Garcia <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa
 

 
I know a guy who pedalled from the mouth of the Yellow River to Lisbon and back to Madrid. Via Tibet, no less. It was a few years back when it was not as hard to go there.
And as for planes being too easy, it's more about whether it's the journey or the destination you want to enjoy... or have the time for ;)

On Aug 6, 2012 4:42 PM, "Trausti Hraunfjord" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
>
> Haha... in Skoda no less.  My father had one of those in the early 70's.... and it died on him a few years later.  I would have made a different choice for a car to use on a trip like that... NOT a new car (those are not as reliable as old-school cars), but I would never have chosen an American car or a Skoda.  Trabant maybe... they are too simple to fail beyond repair.
>
> On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 8:40 AM, Ormar <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>  
>>
>> To me it reminded a book, I readied 50 years ago, how Ji&#345;í Hanzelka and Miroslav Zikmund did same, testing the car - air cooled Tatra.
>> Sure, Africa was different then.
>>
>> >
>> >  
>>
>> > It's OT because they didn't make any panos :(
>> >
>> > I happened across this funky-looking car in my neighborhood
>> > https://dl.dropbox.com/u/14314213/2012-07-23%2009.12.27.jpg
>> >
>> > A guy and his dad drove from one of my neighborhood pubs, all the way through the western coast of africa, all the way down to south africa.
>> > lots of journal entries, photos, and videos, and a map:
>> > http://dlavak.cz/index.htm 
>> >
>> > This is not your american road trip ;-)))
>> >
>> > My mind is blown!
>> >
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Your email settings: Individual Email|Traditional
> Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
> Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Daily Digest | Switch to Fully Featured
> Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe
>
> __,_._,__
 
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Paul Fretheim
In reply to this post by giant_klobasa_monster
I have a 1989 Toyota 4Runner, based on the old Hi-Lux chassis, and it is
really hard to injure. My Facebook friends have already heard this
story, so I apologize to them for being redundant, but I walked away
from a situation a few weeks ago that I thought sure had me headed for
the hospital -

I almost got killed yesterday when a reckless truck driver hauling a
huge, 16 horse horse trailer came careening down the Horseshoe Meadow
road and cut the switchback I was driving up in my 4Runner. The out of
control semi sized rig cut the switchback and suddenly took up the
entire road, including the lane I was driving in and totally sideswiped
my formerly totally clean 1989 4Runner. The impacts were repeated and
extremely violent just inches away from the open window of the truck on
my side - BLAM - BLAM - BLAM!!! Loud as thunder. I was sure my 4Runner
was totaled, and for a moment I expected the entire side of the truck to
give way and metal to slash into my legs any instant!

But to my surprise, when the long, 20 foot high trailer had finished
crashing and gnashing and bouncing along the side of my truck as it
raced by at a way too fast speed for that road, maybe 40 mph, which is
insane for that place, I was able to open the door and step out and the
truck was almost undamaged! While undented and unscratched, there are
black rubber skid marks on the left front fender from the semi-sized
tires of the giant horse trailer, in this case used to haul hay to the
Horseshoe Pack Station, sideswiping us as we tried to get out of the way
of the out of control monstrosity. The cowboy driving didn't make any
effort to slow down, it was like he didn't have any brakes and didn't
even see us anyway.

It will never be quite the same as the rear quarter panel sustained a
small dent and the locking hub on the left front for the 4WD was trashed
and left inoperable and the plastic guards on the left front and rear
bumper were damaged, but other than that all those violent, thunderous
impacts seem to have been rubber on rubber and wheel on wheel, and
though scraped, the tires mostly just bounced off each other.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150987871516849&set=a.110928526848.90247.655366848&type=1&relevant_count=1

It is truly remarkable that the 4Runner was not only not totaled, but
could still be driven normally.

The old cowboy driving the semi tractor pulling the rig, one of those
old flat faced tractors, stopped, eventually, about 100 meters down the
road, and was pretty much in shock too and promised to pay for any
repairs necessary.

"I need the whole road coming around that one!" he explained. Yeah, if
you try and take a 10 mph curve at 45 mph you do. The cliffs are sheer
right there and drop off a good 2,000 feet on the outside of the
hairpin. If we were 1-1/2 seconds further along, he would have knocked
us right over the edge.

I will post some pictures of the switchback and road and cliffs soon.
You won't believe it. And you can't imagine the place unless you have
seen it. It's probably the scariest road in California to begin with. I
know people who have been up it once and won't go again and other people
who have just heard about it and won't go period. I have had passengers
stop in mid-sentence and fall into total silence in fear as I shift into
first gear and crawl around that switchback.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150987872161849&set=a.110928526848.90247.655366848&type=1&relevant_count=1
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Paul Fretheim
In reply to this post by giant_klobasa_monster
I only have 300,000 miles on the Toyota 4Runner. I have a 1982 Mercedes
Benz 300 TDT diesel, what we call in the US a "station wagon." That
thing has 500,000 miles on it. But considering the road conditions, I
would bet on the 4Runner.

Paul Fretheim
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Robert C. Fisher
In reply to this post by Paul Fretheim
Great story Paul but I couldn't access the images.

On Aug 7, 2012, at 10:46 AM, Paul Fretheim wrote:

> I have a 1989 Toyota 4Runner, based on the old Hi-Lux chassis, and it is
> really hard to injure. My Facebook friends have already heard this
> story, so I apologize to them for being redundant, but I walked away
> from a situation a few weeks ago that I thought sure had me headed for
> the hospital -
>
> I almost got killed yesterday when a reckless truck driver hauling a
> huge, 16 horse horse trailer came careening down the Horseshoe Meadow
> road and cut the switchback I was driving up in my 4Runner. The out of
> control semi sized rig cut the switchback and suddenly took up the
> entire road, including the lane I was driving in and totally sideswiped
> my formerly totally clean 1989 4Runner. The impacts were repeated and
> extremely violent just inches away from the open window of the truck on
> my side - BLAM - BLAM - BLAM!!! Loud as thunder. I was sure my 4Runner
> was totaled, and for a moment I expected the entire side of the truck to
> give way and metal to slash into my legs any instant!
>
> But to my surprise, when the long, 20 foot high trailer had finished
> crashing and gnashing and bouncing along the side of my truck as it
> raced by at a way too fast speed for that road, maybe 40 mph, which is
> insane for that place, I was able to open the door and step out and the
> truck was almost undamaged! While undented and unscratched, there are
> black rubber skid marks on the left front fender from the semi-sized
> tires of the giant horse trailer, in this case used to haul hay to the
> Horseshoe Pack Station, sideswiping us as we tried to get out of the way
> of the out of control monstrosity. The cowboy driving didn't make any
> effort to slow down, it was like he didn't have any brakes and didn't
> even see us anyway.
>
> It will never be quite the same as the rear quarter panel sustained a
> small dent and the locking hub on the left front for the 4WD was trashed
> and left inoperable and the plastic guards on the left front and rear
> bumper were damaged, but other than that all those violent, thunderous
> impacts seem to have been rubber on rubber and wheel on wheel, and
> though scraped, the tires mostly just bounced off each other.
>
> https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150987871516849&set=a.110928526848.90247.655366848&type=1&relevant_count=1
>
> It is truly remarkable that the 4Runner was not only not totaled, but
> could still be driven normally.
>
> The old cowboy driving the semi tractor pulling the rig, one of those
> old flat faced tractors, stopped, eventually, about 100 meters down the
> road, and was pretty much in shock too and promised to pay for any
> repairs necessary.
>
> "I need the whole road coming around that one!" he explained. Yeah, if
> you try and take a 10 mph curve at 45 mph you do. The cliffs are sheer
> right there and drop off a good 2,000 feet on the outside of the
> hairpin. If we were 1-1/2 seconds further along, he would have knocked
> us right over the edge.
>
> I will post some pictures of the switchback and road and cliffs soon.
> You won't believe it. And you can't imagine the place unless you have
> seen it. It's probably the scariest road in California to begin with. I
> know people who have been up it once and won't go again and other people
> who have just heard about it and won't go period. I have had passengers
> stop in mid-sentence and fall into total silence in fear as I shift into
> first gear and crawl around that switchback.
>
> https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150987872161849&set=a.110928526848.90247.655366848&type=1&relevant_count=1.
>
>  
>

Cheers
Robert C. Fisher
VR Photography / Cinematography
[hidden email]
http://www.rcfisher.com
Facebook - Robert C. Fisher




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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

jimbo
In reply to this post by Paul Fretheim
Hey Paul,
Read this a couple of times.. respectfully while I enjoyed it .. Well, I think it's got a few holes.. I live in Montana and deal with horses etc on a regular basis .. oddly in my other life I worked at an American Company called Modern Engineering and we did a lot of work, prototype for Toyota.. and we did some work for Toyota which I was involved in on teh trucjk you mentioned.. Yup it's a hell of a truck.. I agree..but it's claim to fame is that it keeps running not surviving train wrecks.. I'm looking out my window at my neighbors horse trailer.. it'll haul 16 horses.. It's 53 feet long and he pulls it with a Peter built.. The trailer when loaded with 16 horses goes over 30,000 #- and is about a 67 /  70  foot rig when hooked up ..depending upon the truck .. I can tell you these rigs can't do switch backs as your presenting them...... just won't happen.  Large curves well maybe.. but not traditional or even close to it switch backs... ----...plus their no where near 20' tall maybe 11 tops for that rig.... Horse trailors that are typically above 38 feet long offer options for enclosed rear wheels but if the trailor has outboard wheels as most do these will anialite the Toyota if they go head to head.. So how's a bout a 16 foot slant 3 horse trailor.. or something like that..

jimbo


Original Message -----
  From: Paul Fretheim
  To: [hidden email]
  Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 11:46 AM
  Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa


   
  I have a 1989 Toyota 4Runner, based on the old Hi-Lux chassis, and it is
  really hard to injure. My Facebook friends have already heard this
  story, so I apologize to them for being redundant, but I walked away
  from a situation a few weeks ago that I thought sure had me headed for
  the hospital -

  I almost got killed yesterday when a reckless truck driver hauling a
  huge, 16 horse horse trailer came careening down the Horseshoe Meadow
  road and cut the switchback I was driving up in my 4Runner. The out of
  control semi sized rig cut the switchback and suddenly took up the
  entire road, including the lane I was driving in and totally sideswiped
  my formerly totally clean 1989 4Runner. The impacts were repeated and
  extremely violent just inches away from the open window of the truck on
  my side - BLAM - BLAM - BLAM!!! Loud as thunder. I was sure my 4Runner
  was totaled, and for a moment I expected the entire side of the truck to
  give way and metal to slash into my legs any instant!

  But to my surprise, when the long, 20 foot high trailer had finished
  crashing and gnashing and bouncing along the side of my truck as it
  raced by at a way too fast speed for that road, maybe 40 mph, which is
  insane for that place, I was able to open the door and step out and the
  truck was almost undamaged! While undented and unscratched, there are
  black rubber skid marks on the left front fender from the semi-sized
  tires of the giant horse trailer, in this case used to haul hay to the
  Horseshoe Pack Station, sideswiping us as we tried to get out of the way
  of the out of control monstrosity. The cowboy driving didn't make any
  effort to slow down, it was like he didn't have any brakes and didn't
  even see us anyway.

  It will never be quite the same as the rear quarter panel sustained a
  small dent and the locking hub on the left front for the 4WD was trashed
  and left inoperable and the plastic guards on the left front and rear
  bumper were damaged, but other than that all those violent, thunderous
  impacts seem to have been rubber on rubber and wheel on wheel, and
  though scraped, the tires mostly just bounced off each other.

  https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150987871516849&set=a.110928526848.90247.655366848&type=1&relevant_count=1

  It is truly remarkable that the 4Runner was not only not totaled, but
  could still be driven normally.

  The old cowboy driving the semi tractor pulling the rig, one of those
  old flat faced tractors, stopped, eventually, about 100 meters down the
  road, and was pretty much in shock too and promised to pay for any
  repairs necessary.

  "I need the whole road coming around that one!" he explained. Yeah, if
  you try and take a 10 mph curve at 45 mph you do. The cliffs are sheer
  right there and drop off a good 2,000 feet on the outside of the
  hairpin. If we were 1-1/2 seconds further along, he would have knocked
  us right over the edge.

  I will post some pictures of the switchback and road and cliffs soon.
  You won't believe it. And you can't imagine the place unless you have
  seen it. It's probably the scariest road in California to begin with. I
  know people who have been up it once and won't go again and other people
  who have just heard about it and won't go period. I have had passengers
  stop in mid-sentence and fall into total silence in fear as I shift into
  first gear and crawl around that switchback.

  https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150987872161849&set=a.110928526848.90247.655366848&type=1&relevant_count=1


 
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Don Bain
On Aug 7, 2012, at 1:03 PM, jimbo wrote:

>  .. I can tell you these rigs can't do switch backs as your presenting them...... just won't happen.  Large curves well maybe.. but not traditional or even close to it switch backs...

I know this road well - it is in fact where my wife and I met! We were leading a wilderness trip for the Sierra Club, many years ago.

Here is a pano of a switchback corner on the Horseshoe Meadows Road similar to what Paul is describing:

        http://tinyurl.com/8bhuumr

Paul's story is completely believable. This is a wide and well graded road, built for a ski resort that didn't work out (not enough snow). It was designed for heavy traffic, skiers from Los Angeles. The grade is relentless, it would be easy for a truck to pick up speed if not in a low enough gear.

There are six switchbacks (hairpins) in all as the road climbs from 5500' to 9200' (and beyond to the meadow at 9900'). It is so steep that hang-gliders launch right off the road shoulder near the top, 5700' above the desert. The current image on Google Earth shows gliders next to the road at Walt's Point.

        36°28'21.44" N 118°06'54.72" W

Wish I was there right now, but unfortunately I am tied down at home most of this summer.

Don


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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

jimbo
Hey Don,
Thanks.. for me the reading was a pretty good tail ( simply told really well maybe..:-)...) The switchbacks I'm used to won't deal with that kind of rig at all. So maybe I need to retract my comments  .. and guess their was a tad more of embellishment for my tastes  anyway.. 16 horse trailors are big rigs.. sadly today those and the 20's are what are typically used to move horses to slaughter in Mexico an d Canada these days... That comment is certainly OT.. I guess. We have an area here that has what I'd call medium switchbacks ...getting up Tom Miner.. so from 5200 feet to about 7000 feet.. a couple of years ago a 10 horse trailor loaded with six slide off in a tight turn and went over.. In the end only 2 horses survived.. they freaked out inside the trailor.. Constructively.. I think what you guys are refering to as switch back are more like curves to me maybe... I've been on switchbacks that are a chore to ride a mountain bike up..
So thanks Don ...for kickin me in the Butt... Paul your story was just too good...:-)..

jimbo
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Don Bain
  To: [hidden email]
  Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 3:14 PM
  Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa


   
  On Aug 7, 2012, at 1:03 PM, jimbo wrote:

  > .. I can tell you these rigs can't do switch backs as your presenting them...... just won't happen. Large curves well maybe.. but not traditional or even close to it switch backs...

  I know this road well - it is in fact where my wife and I met! We were leading a wilderness trip for the Sierra Club, many years ago.

  Here is a pano of a switchback corner on the Horseshoe Meadows Road similar to what Paul is describing:

  http://tinyurl.com/8bhuumr

  Paul's story is completely believable. This is a wide and well graded road, built for a ski resort that didn't work out (not enough snow). It was designed for heavy traffic, skiers from Los Angeles. The grade is relentless, it would be easy for a truck to pick up speed if not in a low enough gear.

  There are six switchbacks (hairpins) in all as the road climbs from 5500' to 9200' (and beyond to the meadow at 9900'). It is so steep that hang-gliders launch right off the road shoulder near the top, 5700' above the desert. The current image on Google Earth shows gliders next to the road at Walt's Point.

  36°28'21.44" N 118°06'54.72" W

  Wish I was there right now, but unfortunately I am tied down at home most of this summer.

  Don



 
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  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Don Bain
On Aug 7, 2012, at 4:08 PM, jimbo wrote:

> The switchbacks I'm used to won't deal with that kind of rig at all.

> Constructively.. I think what you guys are refering to as switch back are more like curves to me maybe... I've been on switchbacks that are a chore to ride a mountain bike up..
> So thanks Don ...for kickin me in the Butt...

Jimbo,

No kicking intended, just thought clarification might be useful.  There are not many roads like Horseshoe Meadows so I could see how you might be envisioning a more typical mountain road.

I think generally a switchback is recognized as any stretch of road or trail that sharply reverses direction, often repeatedly, to gain elevation more gradually. Look at a map of the section of road that Paul and I are referring to and I think you will agree that it qualifies.

http://360panos.com/HorseshoeMeadowsRoad_map.png

A famous set of trail switchbacks are just a few miles north, on the trail to the top of Mount Whitney, 97 in all.

BTW, the term originated with railroads, which literally switched tracks at each hairpin, usually running alternate legs in reverse.

The only road I have seen like that is in Yoho National Park in Canada, where the tour buses to Takakkaw Falls back up a 100 meter section of road between sharp corners.

Don
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Zarl
In reply to this post by giant_klobasa_monster
Hi Don,

Posted by: "Don Bain" on Tue Aug 7, 2012 6:12 pm ((PDT))
> [...]
> BTW, the term originated with railroads, which literally
> switched tracks at each hairpin, usually running alternate
> legs in reverse.

I once took the train from Cuzco to Machu Picchu. Directly after leaving
the train station in Cuzco the train climbs up the hill back and forth
using this type of switchbacks you described. You can see it nicely on
this map:
<http://osm.org/?mlat=-13.5215&mlon=-71.9835&zoom=16&layers=T>

Trausti and Willy, who of you has a pano of this? :-)

Carl
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Ron Rack
In reply to this post by giant_klobasa_monster
Hi Friends,
Here is a fun video of a large truck and a bus passing each other on a switchback
http://www.wimp.com/zigzag/
Would not want to have to drive this road everyday

ron rack

http://360around.com
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Re: totally OT: some czechs who drove from prague to south africa

Paul Fretheim
In reply to this post by giant_klobasa_monster
http://www.wimp.com/zigzag/

An excellent example of "I need the whole road coming around that one!"

Paul
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